TruthFinder Opt Out Guide – How To Remove Yourself In 2021

With near-daily news reports on data breaches and identity theft, it’s no wonder more and more people are looking for ways to remove their private information from the internet.

If your 2021 to-do list includes minimizing your online exposure, you’ll want to ensure that you opt out from data brokers like TruthFinder, one of the most powerful players in the personal information marketplace. Below, we dig into what TruthFinder is and what it does, before providing an extensive and thorough guide for the TruthFinder opt out process.

Not wanting to deal with the manual process of a TruthFinder Opt Out? Get your data automatically removed from TruthFinder and dozens of other people search websites for less than the cost of a Netflix subscription with Removaly.

What is TruthFinder?

Truthfinder

Launched in 2015, TruthFinder bills itself as a “public record search service” offering background information and other data about millions of individuals in the U.S. They are one of the most prevalent data brokers in the industry.

Launched in 2015, TruthFinder bills itself as a “public record search service” offering background information and other data about millions of individuals in the U.S.

By entering a name, address, phone number or email address—and signing up for a paid membership to the service—TruthFinder users can dig up a treasure trove of personal data for any given individual, including criminal and arrest records, financial assets and liabilities, professional licenses, contact and location information, social media profiles and more.

How Does TruthFinder Work?

TruthFinder sifts through thousands of publicly-available sources to develop its vast database of private information, including county, state and federal records; social media profiles; and even sites on the so-called Deep Web. These sources may yield basic contact information, birth and death records, information about family members or roommates, criminal histories and more.  

When a user searches a name on TruthFinder, the site compiles a comprehensive background report on the person, which it suggests may be useful in researching potential love interests, new neighbors, lost or estranged relatives, former classmates, online vendors, celebrities and even oneself.

However, it is illegal to use TruthFinder and other data-mining services to conduct pre-employment background checks, verify eligibility for credit or insurance policies, screen domestic workers, evaluate tenants, determine qualifications for scholarships or educational grants or hire professional service providers.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

Many of the day-to-day activities we partake in have moved into the online world, making our lives far more convenient overall. With this shift, though, comes our information existing in the digital world for anyone to locate. While this may not be too unnerving for some people who point out that the information is already available online, and that data brokers such as TruthFinder do nothing more than aggregate the information from a single source.

That aside, many Americans are simply uncomfortable knowing their private, personal information is not truly as private as they originally thought. It’s disturbing for some to know just how easy it is for bad actors to access their information and utilize it to assist in the commission of things such as fraud, identity theft, digital and/or physical harassment, and more. While the TruthFinder opt out process won’t fully erase all of your personal information from the Internet, it definitely makes it more difficult for people to find your information online.

One you go through the TruthFinder opt out process, somebody searching your personal information on the Internet would be forced to sift through multiple sites and sources to obtain the information that a TruthFinder profile would have provided. Opting out doesn’t make you less immune to online criminal activity, however, it does make you less of an easy target. While we are aware this process, when done manually, may seem like cutting off the head of a Hydra and three more grow back, it’s better to have a sword than nothing at all.

How to Remove Yourself from TruthFinder?

If you’re uncomfortable knowing how easy it is for random strangers to access volumes of personal information about you, you may wish to have your files removed from TruthFinder and other online data brokers.

The process is relatively simple, but it’s important to keep in mind that your information is still available through public records and other sources; however, opting out of TruthFinder and its ilk makes it more time-consuming and tedious for someone to put together a comprehensive background report on you or any other individual.

Additionally, your name and some personally identifying details could still potentially appear in a TruthFinder report for another individual who hasn’t opted out—for example, you could be listed as a possible relative or another associate in someone else’s report.

TruthFinder Opt Out Guide

TruthFinder offers three options for removing your information from their databases: online, via phone, and via mail. For obvious reasons, we highly recommend going with the online approach.

Not wanting to deal with the manual process of a TruthFinder Opt Out? Get your data automatically removed from TruthFinder and dozens of other people search websites for less than the cost of a Netflix subscription with Removaly.

TruthFinder Opt Out: Opting Out Online

The quickest way to complete the process is by filling out the form on the TruthFinder opt-out page.

One you have found the record you wish to remove, proceed by clicking the green “Remove This Record” button next to the report you want removed.

Once you have done this, enter a valid email address and click “Send Confirmation Email.” Once you receive the confirmation email (it may be in your spam folder), click the link in the confirmation email to complete your opt-out request.

TruthFinder Opt Out: Opting Out Via Phone

You can also contact TruthFinder via phone at (800) 699-8081 and provide the customer service representative with your name, address, age and any other information needed to locate the correct record. You may then ask the representative to remove the record; however, this method doesn’t provide any kind of a “paper trail” to verify that your TruthFinder opt out request has been properly submitted and processed.

TruthFinder Opt Out: Opting Out Via Mail

You can send your TruthFinder opt out request via traditional mail to TruthFinder, 2534 State Street, Suite 473, San Diego, CA, 92101. You will need to include your full name, mailing address, email address and date of birth in your request.

Keep in mind that you’ll need to submit a separate request for every name or record that you want removed from TruthFinder’s database. For example, if you want to remove both yourself and your spouse, you’ll need to submit a new request using a different email address for each of your names. This is one of the main reasons why we highly recommend going with the online TruthFinder opt out option.

Not wanting to deal with the manual process of a TruthFinder Opt Out? Get your data automatically removed from TruthFinder and dozens of other people search websites for less than the cost of a Netflix subscription with Removaly.

What Information Does TruthFinder Remove?

When you opt out of TruthFinder, the site will delete its comprehensive report for you, but the sources it used to create the report will still exist elsewhere, both online and as part of physical public records. If your goal is to completely wipe all personal information from the internet, you’ll need to contact each of these individual sources directly to request the removal of your data or ask that it not be made publicly available.

Frequently Asked Questions About TruthFinder Listing Removal

Here is a list of questions that are most frequently asked about the TruthFinder opt out process. 

How did TruthFinder get this information about me (and where else can it be found)?

TruthFinder reports are created through dozens of publicly available sources, including local, state and federal records and other independent sources, such as social media platforms, professional organizations and more. TruthFinder pulls all of this disparate data together to create a single convenient report for an individual. Once you complete the TruthFinder opt out, this report will no longer exist as part of the TruthFinder database, but it will still exist as part of those distinct data sources.

How quickly will my information be removed once I Complete the TruthFinder opt out?

Once it receives your opt out request, TruthFinder acts swiftly to remove your records from its database. This process generally takes up to 48 hours due to the site’s data-sourcing methodology.

After I Finish the Truthfinder opt out, will my information still be visible to others?

Your personal report will no longer appear in searches on TruthFinder; however, your information will remain available in the locations from which TruthFinder sources its data, such as government records, social media and other sources, as well as other data-mining sites. You will need to contact each of these sources directly to request removal of your information. Additionally, your name may still appear as a potential relative or associate in searches for other people. TruthFinder also does not remove sex offender location data from its site.

I have multiple reports in The Truthfinder database. How can I get all of them removed?

You will need to submit a separate TruthFinder opt out request for each report you wish to have removed from the TruthFinder site.

If I opt out, can I still use TruthFinder to find information about other people?

Even if you opt to have your own report removed from TruthFinder, you can still use TruthFinder as a member to search for information about other individuals who have not completed the TruthFinder opt out process.

Not wanting to deal with the manual process of a TruthFinder Opt Out? Get your data automatically removed from TruthFinder and dozens of other people search websites for less than the cost of a Netflix subscription with Removaly.

TruthFinder and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

Effective January 2020, the landmark California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) establishes specific digital privacy rights for California residents, including:

  • The right to know what types of information a business collects about them, as well as any specific personal information the business has collected for them and how it will be used
  • The right to demand that a business delete any and all of the personal information it has collected for them
  • The right to find out the categories of personal information the business sells to third parties, as well as the specific content of any of their personal data the company may have already sold
  • The right to opt out of data collection, sharing and selling activities by any business

Businesses are subject to the CCPA if they meet any the following criteria:

  • Gross annual revenue greater than $25 million
  • Purchase, receipt or sale of personal information from 50,000 or more individual consumers, households or devices
  • Generating at least 50 percent of annual revenue from the sale of consumers’ personal data

The law requires companies, including data brokers like TruthFinder, to honor opt out requests from consumers and provide them with a direct “Do Not Sell My Info” link on their website. Companies are obligated to provide consumers with at least one method for opting out of the collection of their data, via online forms, email, phone and/or traditional mail. Companies’ websites are also required to include a full disclosure of consumers’ rights related to the collection, storage, sharing and sale of their personal information under the California statute.

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